Igantia Therapeutics, a health and research company, is developing a first-of-its-kind medical device and digital health technology for the treatment and study of an age-related ailment that affects most women – hot flashes.

Madorra is developing the first, non-hormonal, medical device treatment for vaginal dryness and atrophy, which will improve the quality of life for breast cancer survivors and post-menopausal women. There are 1.4 million breast cancer survivors in the United States who suffer from vaginal atrophy.

Marz Medical is developing a technology aimed at reducing pain and recovery time for patients undergoing breast or burn reconstruction surgery. The technology will help mastectomy patients, and also individuals who suffered from burns anywhere on their body. Significantly, the technology has already received FDA approval to assist with tissue expansion needed during reconstructive surgery. One in eight women are diagnosed with cancer each year and about 100,000 women undergo mastectomy in the U.S.

Success Leads to Two “Graduations”

These newly admitted startups follow in the footsteps of two graduating companies, which recently raised Series A funding and will move to their own facilities in the Bay Area.

InterVene is creating a novel, minimally invasive device for the treatment of venous disease in the legs, and Prescient Surgical is creating technology that holds the promise of reducing the incidence of surgical infections.

“We are proud of our success rate in launching medical device companies and our ability to help them obtain Series A funding – a critical milestone startups must achieve to commercialize their technologies. Six Fogarty Institute companies have now achieved this turning point, making their vital technologies one step closer to benefitting patients,” Fyfe said.

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